Lesson 26: Un Compañero Nuevo
A New Coworker


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Slow Version



 

Daniel es un trabajador nuevo en una compañía. Se encuentra con Patricia quien le ofrece su amistad, pero parece que las cosas van a ir más allá de una amistad.

Daniel is a new employee in a company. He runs into Patricia who offers him her friendship, but it looks like things are going to go farther than just a friendship.

-encontrarse con alguien – to run into someone, to bump into someone by chance

-parece que – appears that, looks like, seems like

 

Patricia: Hola, ¿cómo estás?

Hi, how are you?

 

Daniel: Hola, estoy bien. Gracias.

Hi, I’m fine. Thanks.

 

Patricia: ¿Eres nuevo aquí? No te había visto.

Are you new here? I hadn’t seen you.

 

Daniel: Sí, hoy es mi tercer día de trabajo.

Yes, today is my third day of work.

 

Patricia: ¡Vaya! Qué bien, un compañero nuevo. ¿Y cómo te llamas?

Wow! That’s good, a new coworker. And what’s your name?

-¡Vaya! –  Wow! It’s usually used as an expression of surprise.

-¿Cómo te llamas? – What is your name? Literally, “What do you call yourself?”

 

Daniel: Me llamo Daniel. ¿Cómo te llamas tú?

My name is Daniel. What’s yours?

-¿Cómo te llamas tú? – This is the way people ask someone’s name in return when they have asked your name first. Notice the word ‘tú’ is added at the end of the question.

 

Patricia: Yo soy Patricia. ¿En qué área trabajas?

I’m Patricia. What area do you work in?

 

Daniel: Entré a trabajar al área de producción. Ya llevo dos días aquí.

I started working at the area of production. I’ve been working here for two days already.

-al agua - “Agua” is a feminine word but we use “el” in front of it instead of “la” so that it flows better. In this case, it’s “al” because a + el makes the contraction of “al.” This is done with many other feminine words that start with –a, such as asma.

-llevar + amount of time – Literally, this means to carry x time. It’s basically just a way to say how long you’ve been doing something or something has been happening. It’s common to say, “¿Cuanto tiempo llevas aquí? – How long have you been here?

 

Patricia: ¿Y cómo te ha parecido el ambiente en estos dos días?

And how have you found the atmosphere in these two days?

 

Daniel: Me he sentido muy a gusto. La gente es simpática y me ha recibido muy bien.

I’ve felt very comfortable. The people are nice, and they have welcomed me quite well.

-a gusto – In this context, it means “comfortable.”

 

Patricia: Qué bueno. Me alegro que te sientas bien.

Cool/good. I’m glad you feel fine.

-“Me alegro que” triggers the subjunctive of “te sientas.”

 

Daniel: Espero que siga así, porque soy medio tímido y me cuesta compartir con las personas abiertamente. A lo mejor cuando se den cuenta que soy tímido, no me van a dar ni la hora.

I hope it continues/stays like this, because I’m a little shy and it’s hard for me to share with people openly. Maybe when they realize that I’m shy, they won’t give me the time of day.

-“Siga” is sunbjunctive because of the trigger “Espero que…”

-ser medio… – to be kind of something

-Me cuesta... – it’s hard for me to… You can also simply say, “Me cuesta” – It’s hard for me. Or “Me cuesta + infinitive” – It’s hard for me to + verb.”

-a lo mejor – maybe, perhaps

-“Se den” is subjunctive because of the trigger “cuando” which expresses an undefined time in the future.

-ser tímido – to be shy or timid

-No dar ni la hora – to be completely indifferent to someone. To not take them into consideration.

 

Patricia: Tranquilo, a todos nos pasa cuando llegamos a trabajar a un lugar nuevo. Nos sentimos extraños. Por supuesto hay personas más amigables que otras, pero no necesitas interactuar con todo el mundo. Pronto estarás acostumbrado.

Take it easy. We all go through this situation when we get to a new place to work. We feel strange. Of course there are people that are more friendly than others, but you don’t have to interact with everyone. Soon you’ll get used to it.

-Tranquilo – calm down, relax. You say it when you don’t want someone to get stressed out or overly concerned about something. Note: You need to change it according to gender. So it’d be “Tranquila” if you were speaking to a girl.

-por supuesto – of course

-todo el mundo – everyone

-estar acostumbrado – to be used to something

 

Daniel: Bueno, tú eres muy amigable, y déjame decirte que eres muy bonita.

Well, you’re very friendly, and let me tell you that you’re really cute.

 

Patricia: ¡Uy! Haces que me ponga roja como un tomate.

Come on! You’re making me blush.

-ponerse rojo/a como un tomate – to make someone blush, to get red as a tomato from being embarrassed.

-“Haces que” triggers the subjunctive “ponga” because you’re being forced to do something, so to speak.

 

Daniel: Es la pura y santa verdad.

It’s the gospel truth.

-La pura y santa verdad – The gospel truth. Something that can’t be denied.

 

Patricia: No eres tan tímido como dices.

You’re not as timid as you say.

-Remember, “tan…como…” is equivalent to the English “as… as…” when making comparisons.

 

Daniel: Lo soy. Sólo que me gusta hacerle saber a las personas cuando me caen bien, especialmente una chica como tú.

I am. It’s just that I like to let people know when I like them, especially a girl like you.

-caerse bien/mal – to like/hate someone. Examples: Me caes muy bien - I like you a lot. Me caes mal - I don’t like you. This expression is only used for people, and it’s meant in a platonic, not romantic way.

 

Patricia: Bueno, gracias. Eres muy gentil. Para serte franca, te vi el primer día que llegaste aquí y me llamaste la atención, pero como trabajamos en diferentes secciones, no había tenido la oportunidad de hablar contigo. ¿Qué te parece si almorzamos juntos hoy?

Well, thanks. You’re so kind. To be honest I saw you the first day you got here and you got my attention, but since we work in different sections I haven’t had the chance to talk to you. How about we have lunch together today?

-para serte franco/sincero – to be honest

-llamar la atención – to get someone’s attention

-¿Qué te parece…? – How does it appear/seem to you…? Basically, what do you think about…? How’s it sound to you to…?

 

Daniel: Me parece fantástico. Creo que me gustará mucho trabajar aquí.

Sounds great. I think I’ll like working here a lot.

 

Patricia: Ok, entonces te veo a la una en el casino.

Ok, I’ll see you at one o’clock at the casino then.

-It’s always “a la una” instead of “a las…” like for the plural numbers. “A las dos” – At two o’clock

 

Daniel: ¡Hecho! Nos vemos.

Deal/done! See you.

-¡Hecho! – This expressión is used when you agree with something that someone else is suggesting to you.

-Nos vemos – see you (later)

 

 

 

For practice, start incorporating these useful Spanish words and phrases into your own conversations:

-encontrarse con alguien – to run into someone, to bump into someone by chance

-parece que – appears that, looks like, seems like

-¡Vaya! –  Wow! It’s usually used as an expression of surprise.

-¿Cómo te llamas? – What is your name? Literally, “What do you call yourself?”

-¿Cómo te llamas tú? – This is the way people ask someone’s name in return when they have asked your name first. Notice the word ‘tú’ is added at the end of the question.

-llevar + amount of time – Literally, this means to carry x time. It’s basically just a way to say how long you’ve been doing something or something has been happening. It’s common to say, “¿Cuanto tiempo llevas aquí? – How long have you been here?

-Me alegro que… – I’m glad/happy that… (Triggers the subjunctive)

-ser medio… – to be kind of something

-Me cuesta... – it’s hard for me to… You can also simply say, “Me cuesta” – It’s hard for me. Or “Me cuesta + infinitive” – It’s hard for me to + verb.”

-a lo mejor – maybe, perhaps

-ser tímido – to be shy or timid

-No dar ni la hora – to be completely indifferent to someone. To not take them into consideration.

-Tranquilo – Calm down. Relax. You say it when you don’t want someone to get stressed out or overly concerned about something. Note: You need to change it according to gender. So it’s be “Tranquila” if you were speaking to a girl.

-por supuesto – of course

-todo el mundo – everyone

-estar acostumbrado – to be used to something

-ponerse rojo/a como un tomate – to make someone blush, to get red as a tomato from being embarrassed.

-La pura y santa verdad – The gospel truth. Something that can’t be denied.

-caerse bien/mal – to like/hate someone. Examples: Me caes muy bien - I like you a lot. Me caes mal - I don’t like you. This expression is only used for people, and it’s meant in a platonic, not romantic way.

-para serte franco/sincero – to be honest

-llamar la atención – to get someone’s attention

-¡Hecho! – This expressión is used when you agree with something that someone else is suggesting to you.

-Nos vemos – see you (later)

 

 

 

Vocabulary list from this lesson:

-trabajador – worker

-compañia – company

-ofrecer – to offer

-amistad – friendship

-tercer – third

-compañero/a – coworker, classmate, team member, partner, etc

-área – area

-producción – production

-el ambiente – environment, atmosphere

-simpático/a – nice (as in friendly)

-recibir – to receive, welcome (in the context of this conversation)

-tímido – shy, timid

-abiertamente – openly

-extraño – strange

-amigable – friendly

-interactuar – to interact with

-especialmente – especially

-gentil – kind, gentle

-oportunidad – opportunity

-contigo – with you

-sección – section

-almorzar – to have lunch

-el casino – casino

 

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